Show Preview | Jamison & Klepper

Houston, TX

William Reaves | Sarah Foltz Fine Art, April 13-May 5

Lee Jamison, Where Once Were Giant Pines, oil, 18 x 24.

Lee Jamison, Where Once Were Giant Pines, oil, 18 x 24.

This story was featured in the April 2018 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art April 2018 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

In the eastern region, there are piney woods along winding rivers where the old courthouses and churches of pioneering days lie nestled amid the greenery. In the western region, the harsh desert lies beneath an expansive sky, with only a few mesquite trees dotting the horizon. The two landscapes are complete opposites that reside in the same state: Texas. This month, two artists bring images of their respective homes together in concurrent solo shows at William Reaves | Sarah Foltz Fine Art. Painter Lee Jamison brings 40 of his contemporary landscapes portraying his home along the forgotten back roads of East Texas. And photographer E. Dan Klepper brings a dozen of his contemporary photographs taken while living off the grid in Marathon, TX, just outside Big Bend National Park. Both shows open on Saturday, April 14, with an artists’ reception from 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Sarah Foltz, executive director of the gallery, says the exhibitions were born from a desire to “show Texas as a state of contrast.” Jamison’s work is about bringing focus back to a part of the state he feels has been lost to stereotypical thinking. “In the 1930s, the self-image of Texas shifted out to the west with the dry, arid lands and the big skies,” he says. “I want to revisit the visual richness of East Texas and try to help people recognize that it’s still an important part of who we are as a state.” Using a combination of painterly brush strokes and blocks of color, Jamison depicts both the rural landscape and the old buildings that helped establish towns as people began moving west in the 1800s. “Once prosperity had returned after the Civil War, you had a rash of brand-new courthouses being built with solid brick,” Jamison says. “They were announcing that era’s sense of what prosperity and dignity meant for that town, and they are still here today.” Jamison includes narrative writings with his paintings, which help give context to the scene as it was and as it is today.

While the gallery has a strong group of artists who focus on West Texas, Foltz says she is drawn to Klepper’s unique approach to the landscape. Many of the works included in his show come from his recently published book Why the Raven Calls the Canyon, which documents nearly a decade of living in one of the most secluded areas of the state. During that time the artist photographed lightning storms, moonrises, and abandoned man-made structures to study themes including time, space, and perception. “Sometimes I look for simple forms in the landscape that are natural or products of chance, and then I study how light, darkness, and the passage of time define their meanings,” Klepper says. The show includes singular photos as well as photo mosaics and images paired together to tell a story. “His minimalist aesthetic gives that sense of majesty and grandness to the landscape,” Foltz says. “You get that greater sense of awe and wonder about the harshness of life out there in the elements.” The shows remain on display through Saturday, May 5. —Mackenzie McCreary

contact information
713.521.7500
www.reavesart.com

This story was featured in the April 2018 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art April 2018 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

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