Show Preview | Indian Market

Phoenix, AZ
Pueblo Grande Museum, December 9-11

Gilmore Scott, Coyote Scatters the Stars, acrylic, 36 x 24.

Gilmore Scott, Coyote Scatters the Stars, acrylic, 36 x 24.

This story was featured in the December 2016 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art  December 2016 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

The Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary’s annual Indian Market works to connect generations of Native artists across traditional and contemporary mediums. The market, now in its 40th year, celebrates all forms of Native art, from contemporary film and expressive painting to traditional beadwork and pottery. The weekend event begins with a grand opening and feature film showing on Friday, December 9.

The event showcases over 100 Native fine artists and artisans from around the country, who display their work on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visitors can join in the celebration of traditional Native arts such as jewelry, pottery, basketry, and rock art, as well as fine art and contemporary works in a range of styles and media. This year’s featured artist is Gilmore Scott, a contemporary painter who utilizes bold colors and strong lines in paintings of his own Diné (Navajo) heritage. Scott draws on the traditional basketry and hogan design of his tribe, while also utilizing the geometric designs seen in Diné rugs.

Nathan J. Lefthand, chairman of the Indian Market, has put together the showcase for the past three years and, as a traditional jewelry artist himself, says the event is important to celebrating Native culture. “Personally, I believe this is a service to others because I’m representing my people,” Lefthand says. “I love seeing new artists come aboard and seeing them emerge and become more well known. We’re all friends, so we’re in this together.”

Lefthand says he recognizes the new and innovative techniques and styles of young, emerging artists, and he wants to help establish these new mediums as part of the larger Native art culture. “Unfortunately, the young artists don’t really follow in our footsteps, so we have to try to groom the next artists and get them in place,” Lefthand says. “One thing that I love to do is help to establish the film medium because digital and technology is the new art form for a lot of new generations.”

In addition to the booths full of art, the event features live musical performances, Native American food, and a special program featuring photos of the event throughout the years. Profits help the Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary continue to raise awareness and support education about Native American culture. —Mackenzie McCreary

contact information
602.262.6713
www.pueblogrande.org

This story was featured in the December 2016 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art  December 2016 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

MORE RESOURCES FOR ART COLLECTORS & ENTHUSIASTS
Subscribe to Southwest Art magazine
Learn how to paint & how to draw with downloads, books, videos & more from North Light Shop
Sign up for your Southwest Art email newsletter & download a FREE ebook

COMMENT