Show Preview | Natalie Featherston

Los Angeles, CA
Maxwell Alexander Gallery, October 13-31

Natalie Featherston, Young Artist Shows Promise—Cowgirl Spirit, oil, 13 x 15.

Natalie Featherston, Young Artist Shows Promise—Cowgirl Spirit, oil, 13 x 15.

This story was featured in the October 2018 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art October 2018 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

“I’ve actually had someone try to scrape off the tape,” says artist Natalie Featherston. “I like to be able to have that moment with the viewer where they’re really not sure what they’re looking at.” Featherston’s trompe l’oeil works are magnetic in their realism. Whether they’re looking at the edge of a cardboard box or a crayon drawing taped to a wall, new viewers of the artist’s work are constantly questioning what is real and what is paint. Featherston brings about eight of her newest works to the walls of Maxwell Alexander Gallery this month for a show opening on Saturday, October 13.

Natalie Featherston, Yippie Ki Yay, oil, 17 x 14.

Natalie Featherston, Yippie Ki Yay, oil, 17 x 14.

Featherston was originally a cellist and was pursuing a master’s degree in music when she realized she wanted a more uniquely creative career. She began taking art classes in various schools and completed an apprenticeship with renowned oil painter Michael Aviano. She was always inspired by realism because of its structure, which reminded her of her musical background.

Works featured in the show offer an overview of the artist’s many interests for subject matter. Featherston is known for her series of paintings that feature collaged scenes constructed out of found objects. However, she is also beginning to explore the western lore of the cowgirl. Many of the paintings feature images of cowgirls taken from vintage photos, surrounded by flowers made from yarn and tissue paper. “I love the dichotomy between crusty cowgirls and aged photos with the flowers,” she says. “I thought it was a funny combination.”

While the artist strives to imbue each work with a story, her most important goal is to create an atmosphere of humor and whimsy in each scene. Other pieces included in the show portray images of crumpled children’s crayon drawings taped up for display. These pieces were inspired by her niece’s drawings, which her father would tape to the wall of his office. “Some of them are abstract scribbles, and some of them are little scenes,” Featherston says. “They’re just happy, and we all need more of that in our lives.” —Mackenzie McCreary

contact information
213.275.1060
www.maxwellalexandergallery.com

This story was featured in the October 2018 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art October 2018 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

MORE RESOURCES FOR ART COLLECTORS & ENTHUSIASTS
• Subscribe to Southwest Art magazine
• Learn how to paint & how to draw with downloads, books, videos & more from North Light Shop
• Sign up for your Southwest Art email newsletter & download a FREE ebook

COMMENT