Show Preview | Greenberg Fine Art: Bruce Cody

Santa Fe, NM
October 11-23

Bruce Cody, Night Light Glitter, oil, 16 x 24.

Bruce Cody, Night Light Glitter, oil, 16 x 24.

This story was featured in the October 2013 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art October 2013 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story!

It Could Be Anywhere, the title of Bruce Cody’s solo show at Greenberg Fine Art, brings delight and satisfaction to both gallery owner and artist. “Invariably, when people see Bruce Cody’s work, they ask, ‘Where is that?’” says gallery owner Mark Greenberg. Cody’s composite approach to several of his paintings in the show supports the title. For example, “STARLITE REFLECTIONS is a composite of three different locations, and part is made up,” Cody says. “The swimming pool is from one motel, the structure is from another, and the background is from yet another. I’m doing more and more composite images.” This painting and more than a dozen other works by Cody are on view beginning Friday, October 11, at Greenberg Fine Art, and Cody attends the opening reception that night from 5 to 7 p.m. The show remains on view through October 23.

Bruce Cody, Starlite Reflections, oil, 36 x 40.

Bruce Cody, Starlite Reflections, oil, 36 x 40.

Cody’s collectors can expect to see another facet to his Americana work—scenes of twilight and nighttime. “I’m finding more and more that the generality of architecture and location are more ambiguous at night than in the light,” he says. Greenberg is excited about these pieces. “These works feature wet streets,” he says. “They’re very moody; it really captures the nighttime feel.”

Cody says that while he was in Denver taking reference photographs in September of 2012, “It was sunny until about 3 p.m., and then it would start raining. Rather than go inside, I stood out in the rain taking photographs. To some, it is very invigorating to be out in the rain, while others run and take refuge.” Cody’s latest paintings allow his collectors to “see the rain as romantic,” he says.

He is also excited to include in this show paintings of trains and gas stations. “I have always loved railroads,” Cody says. “One painting features a steam locomotive in Chama, NM. To me, trains mean a great chance for adventure.” And the gas stations? Cody explains, “They represent a rite of passage, where you fill up the tank and go driving all night. At one time gas stations were sort of a social place—all the guys would meet and look over cars and do repairs.”

“Bruce’s style is very consistent; he’s known for doing small-town, iconic buildings, rail yards, and trains. One thing the collectors always point out is how realistic they are,” says Greenberg. And though his paintings may leave viewers waxing 
nostalgic, Cody is quick to point out that his work is not about wistful reminiscence but rather an appreciation for things—
architecture, community, culture—he feels are worth preserving that are quickly disappearing from the American landscape. —Anne Hopper Vickstrom

contact information
505.955.1500
www.greenbergfineart.com

Featured in the October 2013 issue of Southwest Art magazine–click below to purchase:
Southwest Art October 2013 print issue or digital download
Or subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss a story!


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