Show Preview | Chula Beauregard

Steamboat Springs, CO
Depot Art Gallery, February 2-March 31

Chula Beauregard, Cow and Trees, oil, 6 x 8.

Chula Beauregard, Cow and Trees, oil, 6 x 8.

This story was featured in the February 2018 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art February 2018 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

All his life, Farrington “Ferry” Carpenter (1886-1980) longed to be a cowboy. After graduating from Princeton law school, he started his law practice in Hayden, CO. But he fed his childhood love of the West by purchasing Carpenter Ranch, which sits just outside of town. In an effort to preserve the tradition of ranching, and to address the needs of the changing world, Carpenter used his land to foster environmental growth and preservation. Eventually, the Nature Conservancy purchased the land and continued Carpenter’s work. This legacy is the subject of a new show at the Steamboat Springs Arts Council Depot Art Gallery this month. The show begins with an artists’ reception on Friday, February 2, from 5 to 8 p.m., and also includes historical photographs of the ranch.

The main feature of the show is a series of works by landscape painter Chula Beauregard. When the artist visited the ranch, she was immediately struck by its long-held traditions and rich environment. “I find it embodies what I’m doing with my painting, which is to respect tradition but not be afraid of change,” she says. “It’s a place of bridging gaps and exploring new ways to do things where we can all coexist.” The show, titled The Carpenter Ranch—Generations, features a series of plein-air studies by Beauregard completed over a year at the ranch. They show the changing of the seasons and the year-round inner workings of the ranching lifestyle. “I didn’t want to paint just what I saw as an artist, but the whole fabric of the place,” she says. In addition to the studies, the artist also chose a few of them from which she made larger studio paintings.

The show also features river-rock sculptures by Camille DiTrani. The artist visited Carpenter Ranch through a program with the Alliance of Artists Communities, which invites artists and writers to participate in monthlong residencies in Colorado. DiTrani’s minimalist, contemporary sculptures reflect the importance of the Yampa River, which flows through Carpenter Ranch. “Her work is much more contemporary and explores the same concepts through natural materials, but not in the way you would normally think,” Beauregard says. “She is talking about balance in terms of our use of the natural environment.” —Mackenzie McCreary

contact information
970.879.9008
www.steamboatarts.org

This story was featured in the February 2018 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art February 2018 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

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