Editor’s Letter | The Little Things

Appreciating the small treasures in each issue

By Kristin Hoerth

Feeding Time by Daniel Marshall.

Feeding Time by Daniel Marshall.

This story was featured in the August 2018 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art August 2018 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

Every issue of Southwest Art is made up of both large and small components. The biggest piece of the issue is its overall editorial theme, like this month’s focus on the New West. Each of the five artists we profile this month takes a fresh approach to western subject matter. Whether that means cowboys on horseback, Wyoming ranchland, longhorns and buffalo, or Zion National Park—all of these quintessential scenes are depicted in contemporary styles that challenge traditional, stereotypical definitions of what western art should look like.

But sometimes, the smaller pieces of each issue are equally powerful. These are the many individual anecdotes, ideas, and phrases found throughout the month’s stories, and they stay with me long after the last page has been sent off to the printer.

This month, for example, I’ll remember the phrase “green plus green equals black and blue.” It was new to me, but perhaps you’ve heard it before—it describes the black-and-blue bumps and bruises that often result when a “green” (that is, inexperienced) horse and an equally “green” rider come together. And it’s what happened to painter Sharon Markwardt (page 72) when she was thrown from a horse years ago; once she recovered from her injuries, though, it became a turning point in her creative evolution.

I’ll remember other notable tidbits, too, like the way Minecraft and Legos both help describe the landscape paintings of Michelle Condrat (page 78). And how Daniel Marshall, one of this month’s Artists to Watch, admits to being “a very honest liar” (page 20). And this lovely quote from pastelist Kim Lordier (page 46): “As artists, we’re creating visually what poets do verbally. It’s editing. It’s the choices we make.” I hope you enjoy this issue, and all our issues, from many perspectives.

Finally, I’d like to take a moment to note the recent passing of two women who played important roles at Southwest Art Magazine over the years. Former publisher and advertising sales manager Susan Freilicher, who was part of the magazine’s fabric from 1995 through 2009,  was known throughout the Rocky Mountain region—and particularly in her home state of Colorado—as a tireless champion for art and artists. She passed away in May. Former editor in chief Margaret L. Brown, who led the editorial team from 1997 through 2002, helped expand the magazine’s purview and presided over our very first “21 Under 31” issue. She passed away in June. Southwest Art wouldn’t be the same without their contributions, and we will miss them.

This story was featured in the August 2018 issue of Southwest Art magazine. Get the Southwest Art August 2018 print issue or digital download now–then subscribe to Southwest Art and never miss another story.

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